Dominican University

The Protective Power of Similar Ethnicity: Moderating the Effects of Stereotype-Threat with Latino Students

The Protective Power of Similar Ethnicity: Moderating the Effects of Stereotype-Threat with Latino Students

dc.contributor.advisor Taylor-Ritzler, Tina
dc.contributor.advisor Caldwell, Tracy
dc.contributor.author Osnaya, Adilene
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-20T00:33:59Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-20T00:33:59Z
dc.date.issued 2017-04-19
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10969/1187
dc.description.abstract Steele’s (1997) stereotype threat theory states that members of stereotyped minority groups underperform as a result of being afraid of confirming the negative stereotypes surrounding their group. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of a Latino instructor as a moderator of stereotype threat as found by Marx and Goff (2005). We predicted that Latino students who were given a “diagnostic” assessment by a Latino instructor could perform the same as White students and better than Latino students who were given this assessment by a White instructor. Furthermore, if this prediction was supported, we hypothesized that this finding would be further explained by ethnic identity strength, such that Latino students who strongly identify with their ethnicity would be more affected by stereotype threat and their performance would be hindered following activation of negative stereotypes. Results showed no interaction between race of participant, race of instructor, and ethnic identification strength, indicating no protecting power of similar ethnicity. Despite the absence of an interaction, noteworthy is that simple effects tests showed that Latino students did perform the same as White participants when instructed by a Latino instructor. In addition, the performance of Latino students was better when instructed by a Latino instructor compared to when instructed by a White instructor. Further, these performance differences were pronounced for students with high ethnic identity strength. The implications of the findings are discussed. en_US
dc.subject.other Clinical Psychology en_US
dc.title The Protective Power of Similar Ethnicity: Moderating the Effects of Stereotype-Threat with Latino Students en_US

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